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Bell & Ross Introduce BR 03-94 Multimeter

Bell and Ross BR 03-94 Multimeter

What do you get if you cross the Omega Chronoscope with the Mido Ocean Star Decompression Timer? Answer: the Bell & Ross BR 03-94 Multimeter.

It goes without saying that this watch’s dial is the focal point, sporting six separate chronograph scales in bright and attractive colours. In Bell & Ross’ own words it’s “overflowing” with information, but fortunately for us the dial features a handy key that breaks everything down.

Specifically, the orange scale is a pulsometer, the green is an asthmometer and the white, yellow and brown are all tachymeters calibrated to different speeds. The sixth scale is a standard minutes track in black around the circumference of the circular dial and which is used for traditional timekeeping and regular chronograph timing.

Bell and Ross BR 03-94 Multimeter

The purpose of having all these scales is to allow the wearer to calculate everything you could want to know during exercise and sport. Pulse rate and breathing rate are important vitals that indicate overall fitness, so the inclusion of the related scales makes total sense. The benefit of the triple tachymeter is that you can calculate your speed while jogging, cycling or driving using the relevant speed calibrations of 100m, 250m and 1km across the three scales.

It’s both practical (so long as you only try to use one scale at a time) and aesthetically pleasing with bright colours set against the simple black backdrop of the dial base and matching black ceramic case. However, it’s impossible to escape the fact that “overflowing” is a very apt description and the legibility isn’t as pristine as it could be.

Bell and Ross BR 03-94 Multimeter

The biggest issue for readability comes from the bicompax chronograph subdials consisting of a small seconds and 30-minute timer. They’re intersected by the various scales meaning only half of each counter is present, making them all but impossible to read. Bell & Ross’ solution is to use hands with long counterweights, so you can calculate where the tip hand is pointing (if it’s off the portion of dial present) by working out the inverse of where the back of the hand is pointing. Not an elegant solution but a serviceable one and not likely to detract from the cool factor of the piece.

Bell and Ross BR 03-94 Multimeter

Inside, the BR 03-94 Multimeter houses a Bell & Ross chronograph movement we’ve seen before, the BR-CAL.301. It’s based on the ETA 2894-2 and has a 42-hour power reserve with automatic winding. It does the job but reinforces the idea that you’re buying this watch for its dial.

It’s priced at £4,900, which isn’t quite as accessible as many would like. Especially because its cool, colourful appeal is not dissimilar to that of the recent Omega x Swatch MoonSwatch, which was hyper-accessible. However, it’s important not to forget this is a ceramic watch with a mechanical chronograph movement and a unique dial, it’s not so unreasonable. Particularly as it’s limited to 500 pieces.

Price & Specs:

  • Model: Bell & Ross BR 03-94 Multimeter
  • Ref: BR0394-SW-CE/SRB
  • Case/dial: 42mm diameter x 12.80mm thickness, matt black ceramic case, indicators for 3 tachymeter zones, 1 pulsometer zone and 1 asthmometer zone, minute track painted white on the flange, super-LumiNova®-painted hour and minute hands
  • Water resistance: 100m
  • Movement: Calibre BR-CAL.301, automatic, 37 jewels
  • Frequency: 28,800 vph (4 Hz)
  • Power reserve: 42h
  • Functions: Hours, minutes, small seconds at 3 o’clock, date, chronograph (30-minute counter at 9 o’clock, central chronograph seconds, tachymeter, pulsometer and asthmometer)
  • Strap: Perforated black rubber and ultra-resilient black synthetic fabric with black PVD steel buckle
  • Price/availability: £4,900, limited edition of 500 pieces

About the author

Michael Sonsino

As Junior Content Producer for Oracle Time, Michael needs an eye for detail, which makes it a good thing that his twin joys in life are miniatures and watches. While a relative newcomer to the magazine, he's nonetheless a lifelong fan of fine timepieces, especially those of a more historic nature - if it has a twist of Art Deco, all the better.

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