New Releases Watches

Omega Launch 75th Anniversary Seamaster Aqua Terra Sunray, Teak-Pattern and Worldtimer Editions

Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra 'Blue Summer' 75th Anniversary

We’ve now touched on the majority of the Seamaster 75th Anniversary watches, the Diver 300m & Seamaster 300, Planet Ocean 600m, Ploprof, Ultra-Deep. All that’s left to cover are the trio of new Omega Aqua Terra 75th Anniversary models that complete the celebration. There’s the sunray version, the teak-pattern edition and the World Timer.

Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra 150m 38mm Ref. 220.10.38.20.03.004

Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Sunray 150m Co-Axial Master Chronometer 38mm 75th Anniversary Summer Blue

The first of the new Aqua Terras is perhaps the most understated. It’s a 41mm model in stainless steel with a summer blue dial featuring sun-brushed finishing and a slight fumé gradient. By now you’ll likely have noticed that all of the anniversary models are blue but that each has slight differences in their shades.

Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Sunray 150m Co-Axial Master Chronometer 38mm 75th Anniversary Summer Blue

That’s because the colour corresponds to their water resistance ratings. The Aqua Terras are the lightest at 150m and getting darker as you descend through 300m, 600m, 1,200m and lastly the very dark 6,000m Ultra-Deep. It’s a reference to the amount of light that filters through the water as you descend beneath the waves.

Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Sunray 150m Co-Axial Master Chronometer 38mm 75th Anniversary Summer Blue

Powering this watch is the Omega Calibre 8800, the same one as features in the new Diver 300m. It has a 55-hour power reserve and all the trappings we expect from Omega, such as the co-axial escapement and master chronometer certification. Oddly, despite having the same movement and a lower water resistance, the Aqua Terra is actually more expensive than the Diver 300m at £6,400 compared to £5,800.

Price & Specs

  • Ref: 220.10.38.20.03.004|
  • Case/dial: 38mm diameter x 12.3mm thickness, stainless steel case, blue dial|
  • Water resistance: 150m (15 bar)|
  • Movement: Omega calibre 8800, automatic, 35 jewels|
  • Frequency: 25,500 vph (3.5 Hz)|
  • Power reserve: 55h|
  • Functions: Hours, minutes, seconds, date|
  • Strap: Stainless steel bracelet|
  • Price/availability: £6,400

Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra 150m 41mm Ref. 220.12.41.21.03.005/008

Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra 150m Co-Axial Master Chronometer 41mm 75th Anniversary Summer Blue

Second up is the Seamaster Aqua Terra 75th Anniversary with teak-pattern dial. It has the same 41mm steel case as the sunray version above but there are a few notable differences elsewhere. The most obvious difference is that dial, which has horizontal engraved lines that make it look like the decking of a yacht, hence the term teak-pattern. It really works for the Aqua Terra because with its 150m water resistance it’s a watch that likes to be near the water but rarely in it – short dips off the prow of a luxury yacht are the order of the day.

Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra 150m Co-Axial Master Chronometer 41mm 75th Anniversary Summer Blue

However, the game of spot the difference between the two anniversary watches doesn’t stop there. At 6 o’clock you’ll spot that the date windows are different shapes, circular for the sunray, wedge for the teak. The hour markers are different too (bath tub or triangular) and the teak-edition is the only one with a peripheral minute track. I think these differences are really well executed to make the watches feel like they have different personalities while being so similar in broad terms. The sunray is as gentle as a warm tropical reef while the teak is sharper, like a ship cutting through the surface.

Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra 150m Co-Axial Master Chronometer 41mm 75th Anniversary Summer Blue

Visual differences aside, the biggest change between the two Aqua Terras is actually inside because the teak-pattern one houses a different movement. It’s the Calibre 8900 as opposed to the 8800, which brings with it all the same certification etc. but has a 60-hour power reserve instead. Only on closely reading the tech sheets of the two movements do you notice that the 8900 also has an additional function in the form of the time-zone feature, which allows you to jump the hour hand forward in increments of one hour – like a true GMT without the GMT part.

The price of £6,100 just highlights again that £6,400 for the sunray version is a little questionable considering both watches have the same case and the more accessible of the two has higher specs. In fact, £6,100 is the price on steel bracelet and the difference becomes even more noticeable on rubber strap at £5,900.

Price & Specs

  • Ref: 220.12.41.21.03.008 (strap), 220.10.41.21.03.005 (bracelet)|
  • Case/dial: 41mm diameter x 13.2mm thickness, stainless steel case, blue dial|
  • Water resistance: 150m (15 bar)|
  • Movement: Omega calibre 8900, automatic, 39 jewels|
  • Frequency: 25,500 vph (3.5 Hz)|
  • Power reserve: 60h|
  • Functions: Hours, minutes, seconds, date|
  • Strap: Blue rubber or stainless steel bracelet|
  • Price/availability: £5,900 (strap) and £6,100 (bracelet)

Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra 150m GMT Worldtimer 43mm

Last but by no means least we have the Seamaster Aqua Terra GMT Worldtimer 75th Anniversary. It’s a bit larger than its cousins at 43mm, which makes sense since there’s substantially more information on display. That’s because of the inclusion of the titular GMT and worldtimer complications consisting of a 24-hour scale in the middle of the dial and the cities of the world around the periphery.

Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra 150m Co-Axial Master Chronometer GMT World Timer 75th Anniversary

Well, when I say that the 24-hour scale is in the middle of the dial it’s not actually in the very centre because that’s where you’ll find a depiction of the Earth as seen from the North Pole. I like how they’ve kept the display in line with the theme of the anniversary watches by only colouring the blue of the seas and leaving the land a clean silver tone.

Beneath the dial and hidden by the commemorative caseback is the Omega Calibre 8938 automatic movement. Like the vast majority of Omega calibres, it’s a co-axial escapement piece with master chronometer certification. It has a 60-hour power reserve and features hours, minutes, date, GMT and worldtimer functions. As part of being a GMT it has the same time zone function as the teak-pattern model above, which essentially means it’s a true GMT.

Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra 150m Co-Axial Master Chronometer GMT World Timer 75th Anniversary

It’s available on steel bracelet or rubber strap costing £9,400 or £9,200 respectively. At this price and with these complications, this is the Aqua Terra firmly leaning into the more refined side of its dive-dress hybrid identity. I think it’s a solid entry into the collection but given the choice of the three watches here, I’d go for the teak-pattern edition.

Price & Specs

  • Ref: 220.12.43.22.03.002 (strap), 220.10.43.22.03.002 (bracelet)|
  • Case/dial: 43mm diameter x 14.3mm thickness, stainless steel case, blue dial|
  • Water resistance: 150m (15 bar)|
  • Movement: Omega calibre 8938, automatic, 39 jewels|
  • Frequency: 28,800 vph (4 Hz)|
  • Power reserve: 60h|
  • Functions: Hours, minutes, seconds, date, world time, GMT|
  • Strap: Blue rubber or stainless steel bracelet|
  • Price/availability: £9,200 (strap) and £9,400 (bracelet)

More details at Omega.

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About the author

Michael Sonsino

As Digital Editor for Oracle Time, Michael needs an eye for detail, which makes it a good thing that his twin joys in life are miniatures and watches. He's a lifelong fan of fine timepieces, especially those of a more historic nature - if it has a twist of Art Deco, all the better. Recent purchase: Seiko Prospex 1959 Alpinist Modern Re-Interpretation. Grail watch: Vacheron Constantin Historiques American 1921.