Editors Pick Watches

The End of a Legacy (Machine): MB&F LM1 Final Edition

MB&F Legacy Machine 1 Final Edition

I’m a huge fan of MB&F. Between the intensely mechanical Horological Machines and their table clocks (the Arachnid is something special) they’re a brand that invariably stands out in an industry more saturated than Atlantis. Even their more ‘traditional’ collection is anything but.

The Legacy Machine has all the hallmarks of classical watchmaking, from the subdials to the finishing – except of course that the balance wheel is in completely the wrong place. Rather than being hidden away inside, the beating heart of the watch spins atop the dial.

It’s certainly a statement. It doesn’t affect the workings of the watch in any way other than to make its creation a hell of a lot harder. There is however something mesmerising about it, the perfect coiling and uncoiling of the hair-thin spring.

MB&F Legacy Machine 1 Final Edition

Over the years it’s become one of the most recognised ambassadors of the decidedly niche MB&F, with around 430-odd pieces leaving the manufacture over the years. Like all good things though, the LM1 has to come to an end at some point.

It doesn’t seem to make particularly good business sense to rid yourself of one of your most successful watches, but given the numbers MB&F deal in it’s not so much of an issue. At the very least it means that we can look forward to a replacement. God only knows what it’ll be though; when it comes to MB&F all bets are off.

MB&F Legacy Machine 1 Final Edition

In the meantime it means that the Legacy Machine can go out in a blaze of glory – a fire in the shape of the LM1 Final Edition.

The final version of the Legacy Machine isn’t exactly revolutionary; it’s a tribute to the collection after all. There are however a few little changes, not least of which is the case. Like Patek or Vacheron, you don’t often see an MB&F in steel, especially the Legacy Machine, making steel case of the Final Edition more unusual than it might at first seem.

MB&F Legacy Machine 1 Final Edition

Then there’s the dark brown dial, a colour that MB&F estimate at about 85% dark chocolate. While I prefer milk myself (I know, no accounting for taste) it’s a fitting dial colour for what is a bittersweet release. More subtly the watch also includes the cambered arms holding the balance spring that are otherwise only on the LM101 and the absolutely stunning perpetual calendar.

Limited to just 18 pieces it’s a rather short last bow for the LM1 and I’ll be a tad melancholic to see it go. Still, at least no one can say it’s overstayed its welcome and it’s certainly be interesting to see what Maximilian Busser and his friends come up with next.

www.mbandf.com

About the author

Sam Kessler

Legend has it that Sam’s first word was ‘escapement’ and, while he might have started that legend himself, he’s been in the watch world long enough that it makes little difference. As the editor of Oracle Time, he’s our leading man for all things horological – even if he does love yellow dials to a worrying degree. Owns a Pogue; doesn’t own an Oyster Perpetual. Yet.

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