New Releases Watches

Delma Launch New 44mm Quattro Decompression Diver’s Watch

Running out of air is not your only concern while scuba diving; decompression can prove to be equally dangerous. But that danger can easily be avoided if you have good diving watch, especially if it’s a specialised decompression timer like the new Delma Quattro.

Similar to the Panerai QuarantaQuattro, the Delma Quattro’s name refers to its size, which is 44mm in diameter. Watches that size can be controversial as there are few people with wrists that aren’t dwarfed by them. However, when you’re underwater and wondering if you’re safe to progress or if you’re going to do serious damage to yourself, the extra legibility and confidence afforded by a larger timepiece is welcome. Plus, strapped over a diving suit it will seem far more proportionate.

Delma Quattro

As for the design of the 44mm case, it’s based on the original Delma Quattro from the 1980s. That means a symmetrical brushed stainless steel construction featuring a steel or black DLC bezel with six oversize notches, as well as a hidden helium escape valve and screw down crown. All together it provides a water resistance rating of 500m. With its round sides and pointed notches, the whole appearance is not dissimilar to that of a sea urchin.

Delma Quattro
Delma Quattro

The Delma Quattro on the other hand has a quick change strap system that allows you to swap the body of the watch between a steel bracelet, a rubber strap and a decompression table plate. That plate, which has all the relevant tables on it, can then be attached easily to any piece of diving gear including an air tank. This means the Quattro has all the benefits of being a decompression timer without affecting the legibility of its display.

Delma Quattro - Rubber strap

What makes the design a specialist decompression piece isn’t immediately obvious compared to watches like the Mido’s Ocean Star Decompression Timer or even Delma’s own Shell Star Decompression Timer. Both of those watches have decompression tables on the watch itself, fairly simple to understand and they look amazing. However, they do rather ruin the legibility of the dials.

Delma Quattro 41701.744.6.158
Delma Quattro 41701.744.6.041

Speaking of the display, it’s classic dive watch fare. Large, round hour markers and plenty of SuperLuminova, allowing the watch to be read in the dark depths. A nice flash of colour is provided by the yellow seconds and minute hands, which are the most important hands while diving. Most dive timings are measured in minutes, which is why that hand is vital and the seconds hand proves that the watch is still working since it moves the fastest. The dial itself has three colour options available: black, blue and orange.

Delma Quattro Caseback

Housed inside the Delma Quattro is the Sellita SW200-1 automatic movement. That’s the same movement as can be found in the aforementioned Delma Shell Star and their premier Blue Shark III. It would be nice to see them move on to a calibre with a power reserve higher than 38-hours, especially because with a price of CHF1,990 (approx. £1,850) it’s not exactly hyper accessible.

That being said, it’s not exactly bad value either, after all it has solid diving specs and comes with two strap options plus the decompression plate. On the whole, I find myself seriously liking it, even if it would look comically large on my thin writer’s wrists.

Price & Specs:

  • Model: Delma Quattro
  • Case/dial: 44mm diameter x 15.3mm thickness, stainless steel case, black, blue or orange dial, black or silver bezel
  • Water resistance: 500m (50 bar)
  • Movement: Sellita calibre SW200-1 ,automatic, 26 jewels
  • Frequency: 28,800 vph (4 Hz)
  • Power reserve: 38h
  • Functions: Hours, minutes, seconds, date
  • Strap: Stainless steel bracelet with safety deployant clasp and rubber strap with stainless steel buckle
  • Price/availability: CHF 1,990 (approx. £1,850), limited to 999 pieces

Leave a Comment

*

*

About the author

Michael Sonsino

As Digital Editor for Oracle Time, Michael needs an eye for detail, which makes it a good thing that his twin joys in life are miniatures and watches. He's a lifelong fan of fine timepieces, especially those of a more historic nature - if it has a twist of Art Deco, all the better. Recent purchase: Seiko Prospex 1959 Alpinist Modern Re-Interpretation. Grail watch: Vacheron Constantin Historiques American 1921.