New Releases Watches

Introducing: Hermes’ New Arceau L’Heure De La Lune Dials

Hermes Arceau L’Heure De La Lune Black Sahara

Last year Hermes’ Arceau L’Heure De La Lune was one of the major technical showcases of SIHH, a novel take on the moon phase as whimsical and exceptional as the Parisian brand hopes to be themselves. This year Hermes has held back on the technical innovation and instead developed their new haute horology flagship further with a trio of fittingly celestial new dials and a pair of handsome blue moons.

Previously the Arceau L’Heure De La Lune used aventurine, the mineral glass that goes hand-in-hand with astronomical timepieces, with its midnight blue colour and galaxy of stars. This time though, things have gotten a bit rarer with the introduction of three different types of meteorite dial.

Hermes Arceau L’Heure De La Lune Black Sahara

The Black Sahara meteorite dial with white floating subdials

The meteorites in question are Black Sahara, a spacefaring rock of unknown origin, Lunar meteorite directly from the moon and Martian. All three have very different looks according to the compounds of the rocks they came from.

In the case of the Black Sahara and Lunar that’s a grey black speckled with white, with a finer grain on the former, larger on the latter. Both are exquisite and, thanks to the nature of using space rocks, strictly limited to 36 pieces each. The Lunar is of particular note, with its chocolate brown rotating dials in place of the more classical white.

Hermes Arceau L’Heure De La Lune Lunar

The Lunar meteorite dial with brown with floating subdials

The star of the show though is the invader from Mars. It’s unique geological make-up gives the dial a greenish tint and an incredibly fine grain, a good deal different than even the other meteorite rarities. Unfortunately only two of this version will be made, owing to the rarity and importance of bits of Mars falling to Earth.

All three remain an incredible take on the classical moon phase. That means a dual hemisphere complication that uses the orbiting lacquered subdials to indicate across the static mother-of-pearl moons. You really need to see it in action to appreciate it. You can just about see, if you squint, a Pegasus outlined against the 12 o’clock moon, a subtle ode to Hermes’ spirit animal.

Hermes Arceau L’Heure De La Lune Martian

The Martian meteorite dial with white floating subdials

The complication is powered by the in-house H1837 calibre automatic movement, complete with the exclusive moon phase module.

As you might expect, these pieces don’t come cheap. For the Lunar and Black Sahara it’s around £35,000 and £43,500 respectively. The Martian is price on
application. With only two, that last will be about as common as a new Martian meteorite hitting your car, though thankfully a lot better to look at.

Hermes Arceau L’Heure De La Lune Lapis Lazuli

The Lapis Lazuli dial with white floating subdials

If they’re a bit out of reach (or you just fancy something a bit more terrestrial), Hermes has also released a pair of Arceau L’Heure De La Lunes dressed in blue. Not enamel, lacquer or the usual finishes though. The first is rose gold number with a white orbital subdials and a solid Lapis Lazuli dial, similar to the original aventurine in the shimmering flecks in the stone but a good deal brighter.

The second opts for a white gold case, paired with rare blue pearl which is nothing short of spectacular. It’s a darker, more masculine use of pearl and certainly makes for a uniquely luxurious backdrop for a fantastic complication. Finished with graduated grey subdials, it’s arguably the most handsome of the lot.

Hermes Arceau L’Heure De La Lune Blue Pearl

The Blue Pearl dial with black floating subdials

Neither of these is limited, though we doubt they’ll be particularly common. Not as rare as a piece of Martian meteorite of course, but then anyone that gets their hands on that particular model doesn’t just have a collector’s item; they have an astronomical relic.

In the case of the Black Sahara and Lunar that’s a grey black speckled with white, with a finer grain on the former, larger on the latter. Both are exquisite and, thanks to the nature of using space rocks, strictly limited to 36 pieces each. The Lunar is of particular note, with its chocolate brown rotating dials in place of the more classical white.

Price & Specs:

Brand: Hermes
Model:
Arceau L’Heure De La Lune
Case/Dial: 43mm diameter, white gold (Lunar and Black Sahara), platinum (Martian), Lapis Lazuli, Blue Pearl stone, Lunar meteorite, Black Sahara meteorite, or Martian meteorite dial colours
Water resistance: 30m (3 bar)
Movement: Hermès Manufacture H1837 movement, automatic
Functions: Hours, minutes, date, double moon phase (display of moon phases seen from the northern and southern hemispheres)
Frequency: 28,800 vph (4 Hz)
Strap: Matte Abyss blue alligator (Lapis Lazuli), matte graphite alligator (Blue Pearl), matte black alligator (Black Sahara), matte Havana alligator (Lunar), matte Veronese green alligator (Martian)
Price/availability: €27,000 (Lapus Lazuli), €27,000 (Blue Pearl), €44,000 (Black Sahara meteorite dial), €35,000 (Lunar meteorite dial), €130,000 (Martian meteorite dial), Lunar and Black Sahara models limited to 36 pieces each, Martian model limited to two pieces

More details at Hermes’ website.

Leave a Comment

*

*

About the author

Sam Kessler

Legend has it that Sam’s first word was ‘escapement’ and, while he might have started that legend himself, he’s been in the watch world long enough that it makes little difference. As the editor of Oracle Time, he’s our leading man for all things horological – even if he does love yellow dials to a worrying degree. Owns a Pogue; doesn’t own an Oyster Perpetual. Yet.