Andy Moses Metamorph 1501 2016
Andy Moses Metamorph 1501 (2016)

A lot can be seen in the abstract interplay between water and light, an ever shifting, always changing collection of shapes and shades that’s all but impossible to imitate in a static format. That hasn’t stopped Andy Moses giving it a good go – and becoming one of America’s most influential contemporary artists along the way.

Moses’ latest London solo exhibition, Echoes of Light, has been curated to celebrate the first anniversary of it’s host gallery, the Mayfair-based JD Malat. It’s a spectacular celebration that’s for sure, but well-deserved all the same; the London art scene is nothing if not competitive, and a year feels a lifetime.

Light is evidently the hallmark of Moses’ work. Many artists can say the same thing, however the pearlescent pigments used throughout his pieces in particular transform his abstracts into something more experiential. As the viewer moves around the painting, the pigments catch and shift with the light, subtly changing in an almost organic way.

Geodesy 1503, 2019
Geodesy 1503 (2019)
Andy Moses Geodesy 1501 2018
Andy Moses Geodesy 1501 (2018)

The new exhibition is a fantastic one, with Moses’ concave paintings front and centre. Moses first began work on his now famous concave pieces back in 2003 and has only refined them since. Their curved nature gives the paintings a greater depth than is possible on a flat surface, letting the light play not just on Moses’ signature pearlescent pigments, but within the surface of the painting itself.

The subject matter in these paintings varies from one to the next. Some are pure abstraction, waves of colour drawn straight from Moses’ imagination; others are taken from real-life inspirations such as the landscapes of the artists’ home state of California – expansive deserts, open skies and of course, the Pacific ocean.

Strange Attraction, 2017
“Strange Attraction” (2017)

Alongside these concave pieces, Moses will also be exhibiting a number of new works created solely for this exhibition. While similar in the way they are presented, these paintings take a micro rather than macro view of the subject matter.

It appears as though they are zoomed in, and compressed, sometimes through a telescope highlighting some minute aspect of the landscape, sometimes through a microscope, transforming what we see completely. The organic shapes are still there, but seem almost alien in comparison. Still, if a stunning masterclass in the abstract wasn’t enough, how about a glowing endorsement from the legendary Jeff Koons?

Andy Moses Geomorphology 1702, 2016
Andy Moses Geomorphology 1702, 2016
Andy Moses R.A.D. 1601 2015
Andy Moses R.A.D. 1601 2015

“I’ve always loved Andy’s work. It’s interesting how it embraces many dialogues within the history of painting, from nature, landscape and science to abstraction. The paintings embrace everything while at the same time a sense of negation is always present. This polarity allows you to discover your relationship with the work itself. There’s always a sublime beauty within the work. The co-mingling of time and space, both real and abstract, is one of the most relevant aspects of Andy’s work to me. Moses’ work is powerful and extreme, from the beginning to today, in concept and execution.”

Echoes of Light runs until 20 July at JD Malat Gallery on 30 Davies Street. More information at: jdmalat.com