Allemano Man Watch Review - Oracle Time
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Allemano Man Watch Review

Allemano Man

Automotive watches – however you care to define that pretty nebulous term – are a dime a dozen these days. At the one end you have cool, accessible fun like the watches of Omologato (more on them in our In Focus section); at the other the eye-roll inducing limited editions from larger brands that just paint their standard collection in racing livery. I’m looking at you, Breitling.

It’s easy for an interesting watch to get lost in the noise of revving engines and automotive posturing. Fortunately, I doubt the Allemano Man will ever blend into the crowd. If you’ve not heard of the brand before – and honestly, I wouldn’t blame you – it might come as a surprise that they’ve been building instruments since 1919. Granted, said instruments were for measuring pressure and temperature for the military and, funnily enough, Fiat, but it’s a worthy heritage, nonetheless.

In fact, it’s worth remembering those pressure gauges when looking at the brand’s current collection. Released back in 2019 (perhaps not the most auspicious time to relaunch a brand), the collection consists of the Day, the GMT and the Man, the latter of which is what we have here.

Allemano dial

Its dimensions are something else. The name Man comes from Manometer, an instrument used to measure pressure. That link is pretty obvious from a profile view of the case, which looks wonderfully ludicrous, sitting incredibly high off the wrist.

Don’t let that put you off too much though; it’s not actually as thick as it looks. A good part of that height it simply from where the strap is attached to the case, sitting the case on top. It’s still chunky at 44mm across, but wearable.

That pressure gauge theme follows through to the dial too, which a la a regulator splits seconds, minutes and hours apart. Retrograde minutes, that is, placed at 12 o’clock. Sure, they might be taking their inspiration a little bit too far, but it’s a cool layout nonetheless, especially in the more paredback cream colour. The black’s a bit intense.

Allemano Man caseback

The movement powering the whole thing is a hand-wound, Swiss-made number with a 48-hour power reserve, nicely visible through the exhibition caseback with its Geneva bars. It’s finished on a chunky leather strap with a touch of embossing and the Italian colours of green, white and red.

There’s a lot going on with the Allemano Man. It reminds me most of what Reservoir have done over the years, retrograde and all. Though where they tend to have most of the action on the dial, Allemano have really committed.

It’s the kind of watch I can imagine on the wrist of a burly Italian mechanic, fixing up a vintage car in his workshop near Maranello. That’s where the Allemano Man would find its true calling. I, unfortunately, am a skinny Brit that only really knows spanners as a concept. Even so, I genuinely did enjoy my time with this watch.

Allemano Man wrist shot
Allemano Man wrist sho

A good part of that is because I like the unusual and the kind of watches that have people asking what on Earth I have on my wrist. I got a fair bit of that with Allemano, and generally positively. And after the initial oddness of wearing a pressure gauge, it was actually one of the more comfortable pieces I’ve reviewed.

That’s not to say I’ll be ordering one for myself. At €3,790, it’s a serious investment. But I can appreciate why someone more mechanically minded (and ideally in possession of a 1920s Fiat) would. In fact, for that person in a million, I can’t imagine a more satisfying piece.

Price & Specs:

Model: Allemano Man
Case/Dial: 44mm diameter, stainless steel case, antique white dial
Water Resistance: 50m (5 bar)
Movement: Swiss made calibre, manual winding
Frequency: 21,600 vph (3 Hz)
Power Reserve: 48h
Functions: Central hours, retrograde minutes at 12 o’clock, small seconds at 6 o’clock
Strap: Brown Italian leather
Price/availability: €3,790 (approx. £3,242)

More details at Allemano.

About the author

Sam Kessler

Legend has it that Sam’s first word was ‘escapement’ and, while he might have started that legend himself, he’s been in the watch world long enough that it makes little difference. As the editor of Oracle Time, he’s our leading man for all things horological – even if he does love yellow dials to a worrying degree. Owns a Pogue; doesn’t own an Oyster Perpetual. Yet.

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